What is reverse thrust? Explained by CAPTAIN JOE

More info: www.flywithcaptainjoe.com Instagram: flywithcaptainjoe Today´s question is another favorite of mine. What is reverse thrust and when do you use it? Okay, I´ll break it down for you to the absolute basics. Reverse thrust is used to slow down the aircraft on the runway after touchdown. There are three main components which slow down the airplane on the runway: Primary Braking with disc or carbon brakes similar to your car Secondary with reverse thrust Thrid with aerodynamical braking with the ground spoilers So we have two words in reverse thrust. “Reverse” cause the turbines output is being guided into the reverse direction and as you might not know we apply "thrust" in order to increase the braking action. So let´s look at this video to see what happens at touch-down. Here you can see engine number one of a Airbus A320. At touch-down these flaps open up, so called “reverser doors”. They act as guiding vanes in the mid section of the bypass-channel of the turbine and force the accelerated air of the fan to blow into the opposite direction. Now these reverser doors don´t open automatically at touch-down, no you lift up these little levers which will activate the hydraulic system to apply pressure to the actuator which then opens the reverser doors. Keeping the levers in this position only give you “Idle reverse”, but as soon as you move the levers to the aft position, the engine will spool up creating more thrust increasing the reverse output. The engines will increase thrust up to 70% which then resembles in “Full reverse thrust”. I know it´s odd to think that you would apply thrust again just after touch-down. You can definitely hear the difference between “Idle” and “full reverse thrust”, trust me :) Using the reversers significantly decrease the landing distance, varying between aircraft, weight and environmental factors. If you look at this great video of here, showing a Boeing 747 touching down and applying full reverse thrust you can clearly see how the water on the runway gets blown forwards. I actually experienced that myself landing on a snow covered runway, we applied full reverse thrust and you could literally see the snow blowing infront of the aircraft. So when do you use reverse thrust? Using “idle reverse” at touch-down is mandatory by many aircraft manufactures and airlines. First and far most to immediately decrease the aircrafts speed and to stabilize the aircrafts roll out plus to reduce brake usage. Landing on wet or snow contaminated runways using reverse thrust is absolutely vital to decelerate the aircraft and preventing it from skidding and keeping it in a straight line. Full reverse thrust is not permitted at some airports due to noise abendement procedures or at least restricted in between hours from here to then. Nevertheless pilots can use full reverse thrust when deemed necessary, but might have to state their decision in a report. Airplanes with wing mounted engines may only use full reverse thrust until slowing down to a specified speed, cause using the reverser below that speed could blow up loose gravel on the runway which could get sucked into the engine and damage the turbine. For example in an Airbus A320 you would have to reduce "full reverse thrust to idle reverse" at 70 knots, and retract the reverser at speeds below 40 knots. There are many different reverser types out there, but all work after the basic principle by forcing the air or even the exhaust into the opposite direction. So I hope I´ve answered another aviation related question for you. If you have a question that´s been on your mind, don´t hesitate to write me, therefore subscribe my channel, check out my website and spread the word! Farewell your Captain Joe Info: Fairly often you see executive jets using reverse thrust during taxi, to reduce break usage whilst rolling down sloping taxiways. Cause of their high mounted engines pilots don´t need to worry damaging the turbine due to gravel on the asphalt. And the well know MD80 with her rear mounted engines use to have a power back procedure, where they used reverse thrust to back out of a gate position. I´m not 100% if that procedure is still around? Maybe you know? To me that looks very dangerous.

Comments

Manab Bhowmik tv: Why in flight people had to switch off mobile phones???

Victor Guerra Ruiz: Hi Captain! My question to you is what does that "charly", "foxtrot" information... and all kind of stuff mean. The only thing I know is that the cockpit inform tower of this in the very first contact, but I still don't know what does that mean. Thank you so much!

Хатаи Рашидов: thanks Joe

TheTechno Guy: your so awesome captain joe

Giu MacGyver: Geil!

ToyotaGT1Racer: How much force does the full reverse thrust produce? I have seen videos of military aircraft stopping in ridiculous distant immediately after touchdown.

ASA1689: Finalyyyyyyy somebody who answers the real useful important issues,,, Joe where have you been all my life buddy! thanx a lot!

Bodor Csaba: Cut out the music. It's embarrassing.

Jo Le: Hi for what are those small flap small wings on the engines?

Fin Moore: Why can't they reverse the plane

Amber W: Thumbs up for playing "Love on a Train"!!!

pete a: what is reverse thrust? is it thrust that goes in reverse maybe

Alexander Roderick: As I understand it, to prepare astronauts to land the space shuttle orbiter they would practice by landing a mid size cargo jet that could impersonate a very poor glider by running its thrust reversers in flight and leaving the gear down.

mahmod wassel: nice work captain joe

MadMaxGaming: Do planes have a key to start like a car?

Jacob Hau: do the compressor blades also reverse or is it just kinda like a compressor where it goes around the engine and is shot out

Mafasz Mashoor: What is that black & white rotating thing beside the thrust lever in an Airbus?

Phillip Mulligan: I love the roar of a large GE high bypass turbofan engine in full reverse thrust.

Hammad Rehmani: GREAT video...:)

Billy Sugger: I was a passenger in a rear window seat on a short US domestic flight in the early 1990s on a turbojet 737 with clamshell reverse thrust. The flight was scheduled to take 25 minutes, left 5 minutes late and the pilot made that up en route. After topping out briefly at 11,000 feet, he descended more steeply than I've ever descended (in a passenger aeroplane), came in hot, speed brakes out most of the way down to avoid overspeed, and deployed this reverse thrust in the flare before touching down. It was like a roller coaster ride! I've had several people since telling me that's impossible because you can't deploy reverse thrust without being on the runway. I have to tell you I've seen it first hand! Admittedly it was a ropey old 737, and maybe built before such interlocks were added (or they'd been removed on this bird). I've flown a lot and never seen the like again.

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